Gold Coast Suns (AFL) Football Club

I was recently asked by advertising agency Tusk to produce some images for the Suns AFL team.

The brief called for stylized shots to be shot during the day, but appear as if they were during an actual night game, while focusing on the Suns Merchandise for retail.

To get the look we were after, I had my right hand man Josh hold an strobe with an umbrella on a pole above our key talent, in what we cheekily refer to as “the Leibovitz” since Annie seems to do it a fair bit. We then underexposed the scene, making sure that the only light coming through was from the light we were firing. The talent that was not the absolute focus of each hero shot vanished into the falloff.

To complete the mood, we had 2 more lights behind the talent, one in a large softbox to the left of shot, and one high up behind everyone facing towards the camera. These gave the lighting I envisioned would be there at a real game.

We then shot players David Swallow, Campbell Brown, and Maverick Weller on field and in the locker room. For these we used a range of single light beauty dish to 3 light setups.

The product component was shot by our friends at Many Things.

Special thanks to all the cast, players, Tayah Bot from the Suns & Andrew Suggit & Darren Gill from Tusk

 

 

Back the Hell Up Punk

Earlier this week I wrapped a shoot that went over 2 days, in which I shot tethered or straight into the computer for the entire time. The shoot went real well and everyone was happy as it was a big logistical effort to get all the elements right.
The moment I walked in the door, I started typing an email when….BANG, the computer went dead and would not boot back up. Over a couple hours I found out that my hard disk had failed and I had lost everything on there.
Now, luckily I had stuck to a backup system and didn’t wind up losing anything. The shoot had been backed up as I went to another drive, so when I fired the shutter it went to 2 places, the laptop & an external drive. Plus between my server and Time Machine, I didn’t lose anything except my laptop for a couple days. I was able to keep working on my desktop and thanks to the service at Apple they had a new drive installed in about 12 hours.
It took me a long time sifting through a lot of articles and talking to different people to figure out a good way to store my digital assets, and there is a lot of info out there from photographers with all different budgets, so I thought I’d share how I do mine in the hope that it helps someone out there. I made a nice little diagram to explain.

Beyond the Work & Extending your Vision

I’ve recently been shooting more complex projects from a production value point of view, which in turn has had me exercising my ability to extend my vision beyond the creative into building a team to work with.

Last project was a 4 day shoot with 7 crew including myself, plus art director, client production staff, and brand representatives to ensure we were within the client’s brand message. We had permits to secure access and shoot in public locations and were scheduled down to the minute. Everything from names of each talent and crew member attending each location down to switching on/off ambient lights had to be organized in advance. We built sets with props and furniture, made up and styled 30 plus talent, recreated sunlight, and used artificial light to reproduce window lit scenes. I shot tethered straight into a computer and at most point had a number of client representatives and stakeholders watching every shot in real time as I shot them. Obviously all of the above work is done by a team who, from the moment of being appointed the project, I relied on to help me deliver the final product.

All of this is not possible without putting 100% of trust in people that can either make or break the job. This is where vision extends beyond the work and into other areas of being a creative professional, knowing the work we want to do, how we want to do it, and who we want to do it with. Every detail adds to the outcome like creating the right vibe on set, making sure people are fed and happy, and presenting a unified front as a team to the client. This is what creative shoots are good for, building relationships and locking in the team.